Skip to main content

Nous Theatre Proudly Presents



“In every corner of being myself there is a little of you left and now I must start to lose it.”

A white librarian and a coloured schoolteacher in South Africa in the 1960s discover their love is easily fractured by apartheid.

On a bare stage, the pastiche of conversations and monologues mirrors the changeability of human connection: of suddenly discovered sympathies and the chasms created by misunderstanding and shame. Fugard’s play shows the painful truth that apartheid’s most exacting humiliation was the stripping of dignity and selfhood. In sparse, resonant language the truth is clear: there can be no intimacy where there is no equality.

Tonight – after weeks of planning and fretting – is the opening night of Nous Theatre’s production of Athol Fugard’s Statements Taken After an Arrest Under the Immorality Act! It’s hard to believe somehow it's gone from germinating idea about forming a company to box office tickets already. It's been a privilege.

I’ve seen the play twice through and it’s a gutsy, intimate drama. As Marketing Director, it’s my proud duty to let people know about the play, so if you’re in the Oxford area come see Statements at the Burton Taylor Theatre from Feb 1-5th at 7.30. You really can’t have anything better to do.

Book tickets here

More information at our website and our Facebook page.

You can read Milja Fenger’s (director) interview with Athol Fugard here.

Comments

Annie said…
I hope this goes well for you. I've seen a lot of Fugard's work and have the greatest respect for him as a playwright. I haven't seen this but it sounds as though in terms of presentation it might be similar to the Pinter double bill Landscape and Silence. I'm sure you'll have a resounding success.
Thanks, Annie. I'd love to do a Pinter play! (although I haven't read Landscape or Silence).
Annie said…
Have you thought about 'A Kind of Alaska'? Although you do need a really strong actress to play the Judi Dench role. I had great fun with that one.
kjz said…
How did it go? Sounds interesting!
Blogger said…
I have just downloaded iStripper, and now I can watch the hottest virtual strippers on my desktop.

Popular posts from this blog

More Moomins

A friend once said that the thing she loved about Japan was that the Japanese loved every season, and made a great effort to celebrate holidays and seasons with specific rituals. As a person who enjoys holidays, and who finds meaning participating in the ritual of the Christian year, I feel a kinship with the Japanese. As humans, we respond to the larger, uncontrollable mysteries of life with stories, with food, with a renewed sense of connection to each other and to the world around us.

It is easy, with the early darkness and the frost on our windshields and the necessity of coats and thicker socks, to complain about the dying of the year and the coming of winter.

Here is a must-read this time of year: Tove Jansson’s Moominvalley in November. Where her other Moomin books have been characterized by happy bohemianism and quirky, midsummer adventures, this book is not afraid to deal with the stark and empty season that comes once a year.

It is raining steadily upon the tall dark trees. D…
There’s a sudden late surge of warmth in the rough winds today and it’s the perfect day to read one of John Clare’s best sonnets:

November

Sybil of months & worshipper of winds
I love thee rude & boisterous as thou art
& scraps of joy my wandering ever finds
Mid thy uproarious madness – when the start
Of sudden tempests stir the forrest leaves
Into hoarse fury till the shower set free
Still the hugh swells & ebb the mighty heaves
That swing the forrest like a troubled sea
I love the wizard noise & rave in turn
Half vacant thoughts & self imagined rhymes
Then hide me from the shower a short sojourn
Neath ivied oak & mutter to the winds
Wishing their melody belonged to me
That I might breath a living song to thee

Cassandra at the Wedding - Dorothy Baker

The perfect airplane read for a person en route to a wedding, this tautly written 1962 novel about a woman falling apart, coming home to her family’s ranch to derail her twin sister’s wedding. That’s the summary – but obviously it’s about so much more: about the nature of love and obsession, about identity and the self.

Cassandra Edwards, named for the doomed wailer at the gates of Troy, is a student at Berkley, an “Existentialist-Zen-Marxist, Freudian branch. Deviation, rather.” The reader is fully aware from the beginning that Cassandra feels antagonistically about the wedding – she anticipates duties of “tak[ing] over the bouquet while [Judith] received the ring, through the nose or on the finger, wherever she chose to receive it…” She purposefully gets the groom’s name wrong. She plans to stage a “last-minute rescue.”

The isolated family ranch the Edwards family as a self-sufficient unit – emotionally and intellectually. Her alcoholic father, a retired skeptical philosopher who act…